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Preserve Your Legacy

Estate Planning | Elder Law | Special Needs Planning

AN INSIDER'S GUIDE TO LIVING TRUSTS IN NEW YORK: PART 3 OF 3

AN INSIDER'S GUIDE TO LIVING TRUSTS IN NEW YORK: PART 3 OF 3

To fund your living trust, you need to transfer assets into your trust. You can transfer money and property into your trust by placing title to your bank account and title to your real property into the trust. You must specifically identify the property and accounts within your trust.

In addition to properly funding your living trust, you need to appoint an individual or trust company to oversee and administer your living trust. The New York Estates, Powers and Trusts Law governs the administrative duties of trustees. Specifically, Article 7 of the New York Estates, Powers and Trusts Law sets forth the specific rules governing trusts. Part 2 of Article 7 establishes the specific duties and rules governing trustees.

Although there may be public confusion whether living trusts are contestable, they are. An attorney can minimize the opportunities for trust contests, but it is impossible and illegal to place a blanket provision in your trust prohibiting future contests. You should avoid sales pitches by trust companies attempting to sell you their trust services if they falsely promise to make them “fool-proof.” If you purchased a service from these companies, make sure you talk to your attorney about the living trust document they sold you before returning them.

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