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ANSWERS TO 6 IMPORTANT MEDICAL ESTATE PLANNING QUESTIONS (PART ONE OF TWO)

ANSWERS TO 6 IMPORTANT MEDICAL ESTATE PLANNING QUESTIONS (PART ONE OF TWO)

A benefit of estate planning is that you get your questions answered about all kinds of estate planning issues. For example, you find out how to prevent problems and how to create positive solutions, regarding medical planning. Here, we’re answering the 6 important medical estate planning questions we receive the most frequently. We’re including two parts to this article because there are so many questions and the answers are important to everyone.

1. What is an advanced medical directive?

An advanced medical directive is a legal document wherein you make a medical decision before you need it. You’re making a medical decision now for a potential situation sometime in the future. Examples of an advanced medical directive are a living will, health care proxy, and organ donation authorization.

2. I already signed a HIPAA release at my doctor’s office; do I need another one?

You likely signed a HIPAA release authorizing the medical office to release information about your medical record to your health insurance company so they can get paid. You need a HIPAA release that honors federal medical privacy laws and authorizes your medical staff to communicate with your health care agents, named in your health care power of attorney.

3. Who Needs a Living Will?

A living will is effective if you are in an end-stage medical condition such as an irreversible coma or persistent vegetative state. Each and every person, age 18 or older, needs a living will if that person wants to avoid end-of-life medical heroics, including life support machines. The United States Supreme Court has rules that a living will is clear and convincing evidence of the desire to not be kept alive with medical heroics.

Continue reading Answers to 6 Important Medical Estate Planning Questions (Part Two of Two)tomorrow to learn more and get your medical estate planning questions answered. If you have questions about your individual situation, consult with a qualified estate planning attorney.

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