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Estate Planning | Elder Law | Special Needs Planning

HOW TO AVOID CONFLICT WHEN SELECTING A GUARDIAN IN YOUR WILL (PART 1 OF 2)

HOW TO AVOID CONFLICT WHEN SELECTING A GUARDIAN IN YOUR WILL (PART 1 OF 2)

When you take the time to design your will with your estate planning attorney, you must make the difficult decision of appointing a guardian for the care of your minor children. Many parents struggle with this decision. It’s a good idea to take extra care when making this choice, so that you avoid future conflict. Take a look at some of the tips below for advice on how to avoid conflict when choosing a guardian.

  • What if you’re not sure how your children will feel about your decision?

If your children are old enough, it’s a good idea to include them in discussions related to your guardian selection. You not only want to assure your children that they will always be loved and protected, but you also want to make sure that they will get along with their guardians. Take the time to listen to their opinions on the matter.

  • What if your guardian lives far away?

If you decide to appoint a guardian who lives out of town, it’s a good idea to also name a temporary guardian. This will allow your children to be protected before your guardian arrives. Your children will be cared for by the temporary guardian, until your permanent guardian is able to get to your children. This avoids your children being placed into foster care in the event of an emergency.

  • What if the guardian that you choose is bad with money?

If you’re afraid that your guardian will be unable to manage the money that you leave, you should consider naming another individual to manage these assets. This will allow your guardian to only provide care and physical support, while the other individual will handle financial decisions for your children.

Choosing a guardian is the most important decisions that you will have to make when creating your will. By taking a little extra care, you can avoid future conflicts before they arise. Take a look at our next blog post tomorrow (part 2 of 2), to learn more ways to avoid these conflicts.

If you have any questions, or if you’d like to create your will, consult with a qualified estate planning attorney.

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